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Recue personnel navigate a trail on Mt. Washington.
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Search and Rescue Funding FAQs

Listed below are commonly asked questions regarding Search and Rescue missions occurring in New Hampshire:

How many Search and Rescue Missions occur in New Hampshire and what is the cost of these missions?
Over the past six years (FY 2006-2012), the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department conducted approximately 957 search and rescue missions, at an approximate cost of $1.8 million.
Why is there a crisis in funding wilderness search and rescue activities in the Granite State?
Who pays for these search and rescue missions?
In spite of what most people believe, tax dollars are not used to support these missions. To help funding Search and Rescue efforts, a $1 fee added to every boat, OHRV, and ATV registration is deposited into the Search and Rescue Fund. Any costs above and beyond what the boat and OHRV fees bring into Fish and Game each year must be covered with revenue from hunting and fishing license fees.
What groups receive Search and Rescue services in New Hampshire?
Climbers and hikers utilize 57% of all search and rescue services. Hunters, anglers, boaters, snowmobilers and ATV riders combined use 14% of the total services. Interestingly, 43% of all search and rescue missions are conducted on White Mountain National Forest properties.
What services are required for missing or runaway children and elderly persons who become lost?
The elderly, missing children and escapes from medical facilities are often of great interest for news outlets and the general public. In spite of the extensive press coverage they receive, these types of incidents account for just 17% of all search and rescue services each year.
How much money is spent on Search and Rescue each year?
Over the three years from 2010 to 2012, Fish and Game's expenditures for conducting search and rescue missions averaged approximately $360,000 annually.
Does Fish and Game recoup search and rescue costs from negligent people?
In 2008, a law was passed authorizing Fish and Game to request reimbursement from negligent hikers. If a person’s behavior is determined to be negligent and, as a result of their negligent actions, a search mission was initiated, they may be asked to reimburse the Department for the costs of the mission. While this change in the law has helped Fish and Game recoup some costs, it falls far short of supporting the search and rescue program.
What is the process for determining if a rescued person is billed?
All Search and Rescue missions go through a review process involving guidelines established by the N.H. Attorney General's Office. That process involves the mission's supervisor within Fish and Game Law Enforcement, N.H. Fish and Game Department administration, and final concurrence through a review by the N.H. Attorney General's Office. All cases are unique and not all will get billed.
Is Fish and Game doing anything to reduce the need for search and rescues?
Since 2003, Fish and Game, the White Mountain National Forest and outdoor organizations have worked together on a high-profile outreach program called HikeSafe, intended to educate outdoor enthusiasts about the need to be prepared and how to act responsibly when enjoying the outdoors. This program has served as a successful model for several other states. Review the Hiker Responsibility Code at www.hikeSafe.com.
It hardly seems fair that sportsmen and women pay for search and rescue services; what can be done to change this?
There certainly needs to be a more equitable way to support these services. Over the past twenty years, New Hampshire Fish and Game has submitted a dozen different ideas and bills to the Legislature for consideration in an effort to address the financial shortfalls in the Search and Rescue fund in a way that would allow the broader public, which benefits from the services, to help pay for them. To date, most have failed to pass.

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NH Fish and Game Dept.
11 Hazen Drive
Concord, NH 03301

603-271-3421
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